Memory Wall Inhabited, Hagai Segev

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Belle Shafir’s new work is a video-art work combined with the physical dance of the artist’s body and soul on the backdrop of family historic photos. 

Set against the backdrop of the projection of drawn images on the walls of the gallery, the artist moves in a dance that relate to the content portrayed on the walls. Projected drawings are ‘stamped’ onto the artist’s body, while she dances. 

Shafir attempts to infiltrate or perhaps unite body, history and memory.

The drawings projected were created based on historic photos from family albums. Drawn on architects’ sketching paper, then transferred, by means of photography, from the paper to video. The drawings are projected three of the gallery’s walls via powerful projectors. 

The choreography was directed with the assistance of the choreographer Ruth Eyal. Shafir reacts and relates to scenes from her family’s history. She performs in front of the walls upon which the video is projected: moves and reacts in associative gestures to the images on the wall. 

The photos come to life and re-awaken. The combination of old photography in which the past is emphasized, is contrasted with the real physical body of the artist; Thereby, transforming Shafir’s body into a platform of projection uniting past and present.

The combining of mediums suggests a new perspective, regarding two-dimensional images versus those of three-dimensional ones. How are different sensations created via the use of a particular medium, and what happens when it is displayed alongside another medium? Are the accepted principles of each one of the mediums preserved or are we witness to the creation of a new artistic and emotional experience?

Belle Shafir’s new work is a video-art work combined with the physical dance of the artist’s body and soul on the backdrop of family historic photos. 

Set against the backdrop of the projection of drawn images on the walls of the gallery, the artist moves in a dance that relate to the content portrayed on the walls. Projected drawings are ‘stamped’ onto the artist’s body, while she dances. 

Shafir attempts to infiltrate or perhaps unite body, history and memory.

The drawings projected were created based on historic photos from family albums. Drawn on architects’ sketching paper, then transferred, by means of photography, from the paper to video. The drawings are projected three of the gallery’s walls via powerful projectors. 

The choreography was directed with the assistance of the choreographer Ruth Eyal. Shafir reacts and relates to scenes from her family’s history. She performs in front of the walls upon which the video is projected: moves and reacts in associative gestures to the images on the wall. 

The photos come to life and re-awaken. The combination of old photography in which the past is emphasized, is contrasted with the real physical body of the artist; Thereby, transforming Shafir’s body into a platform of projection uniting past and present.

The combining of mediums suggests a new perspective, regarding two-dimensional images versus those of three-dimensional ones. How are different sensations created via the use of a particular medium, and what happens when it is displayed alongside another medium? Are the accepted principles of each one of the mediums preserved or are we witness to the creation of a new artistic and emotional experience?